Digital Traces of Conflict

Digital Traces of Conflict

War and violence impacts the lives and health outcomes of over 1.5 billion people. In the past decade, information technology has forever changed how violence is organized, funded, communicated, and observed. Armed groups now announce their formation, boast of their victories, recruit new members, and solicit funds on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Civilian journalists use social media to uncover human rights abuses, document ceasefire violations, identify food and medical shortages, and chronicle the suffering of daily life in conflict zones.

Our initiative

In 2021, Digital Traces of Conflict Project is building a global archive to preserve this invaluable data, pioneering the machine learning tools to capture and analyze this information, and establishing a global cross-industry collaboration to confront social media’s transformation of conflict. 

Our initiative strives to become the global leader of impartial analysis and action by:

  • Building a global network of leaders in machine learning, social media, and conflict.
  • Producing a global database of conflict-related media – documenting millions of images, videos, and audio data for more than twenty conflicts.
  • Pioneering a computational toolkit for conflict media analysis and developing an associated platform to share libraries of labels, models, and algorithms
  • Convening leaders in machine learning, social media, and conflict to perform humanitarian functions that social media platforms lack the capacity, expertise, incentives to do.
 

Our team

DToC brings together machine learning experts, conflict specialists, human rights advocates, and social media specialists. Our current list of collaborators includes leading academics and researchers from Princeton University, the University of Oxford, Carnegie Mellon University, University of Alberta, and the University of Regina, as well as practitioners and humanitarians from global NGOs.

Contact us at brian.mcquinn@uregina.ca

 

War and violence impacts the lives and health outcomes of over 1.5 billion people. In the past decade, information technology has forever changed how violence is organized, funded, communicated, and observed. Armed groups now announce their formation, boast of their victories, recruit new members, and solicit funds on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Civilian journalists use social media to uncover human rights abuses, document ceasefire violations, identify food and medical shortages, and chronicle the suffering of daily life in conflict zones.

 

Our initiative

In 2021, Digital Traces of Conflict is building a global archive to preserve this invaluable data, pioneering the machine learning tools to capture and analyze this information, and establishing a global cross-industry collaboration to confront social media’s transformation of conflict. 

Our initiative strives to become the global leader of impartial analysis and action by:

  • Building a global network of leaders in machine learning, social media, and conflict.
  • Producing a global database of conflict-related media – documenting millions of images, videos, and audio data for more than twenty conflicts.
  • Pioneering a computational toolkit for conflict media analysis and developing an associated platform to share libraries of labels, models, and algorithms
  • Convening leaders in machine learning, social media, and conflict to perform humanitarian functions that social media platforms lack the capacity, expertise, incentives to do.
 

Our team

DToC brings together machine learning experts, conflict specialists, human rights advocates, and social media specialists. Our current list of collaborators includes leading academics and researchers from Princeton University, the University of Oxford, Carnegie Mellon University, University of Alberta, and the University of Regina, as well as practitioners and humanitarians from humanitarian agencies.

 

Contact us at brian.mcquinn@uregina.ca